BirdLife Advice: Decision on the EU 2030 Biodiversity Technique

Before the European Parliament adopts its own own-initiative report on the EU Biodiversity Strategy by 2030, BirdLife Europe, the European Environment Bureau and the European Bureau of WWF share their joint recommendations on priorities that should be supported by Parliament and answer common myths and Questions about the implementation of this strategy.

Overall, we welcome the EU biodiversity strategy for 2030 as an ambitious and scientifically sound draft for dealing with the biodiversity and climate crisis over the next 10 years as an essential part of the European Green Deal.

This strategy was adopted at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and recognizes the need to base long-term policies on science to improve our resilience to future crises. The biodiversity strategy must become the central effort for a truly environmentally friendly and sustainable post-crisis recovery, and its implementation should be closely linked to the implementation of an ambitious farm-to-fork strategy.

The strategy appears bold on paper, but it also contains commitments that need to be critically refined with concrete objectives and clear guidelines to ensure that the strategy is effectively implemented by Member States and other relevant stakeholders on the ground.

The clock is ticking and we have a very short window of time to make a permanent change. The 2019 IPBES Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services highlights that nature is mankind's most important life-sustaining “safety net”, yet the current response to biodiversity loss is inadequate with 1,000,000 species threatened with extinction . Scientists tell us that only a profound shift between economic, social, political, and technological factors can reverse the decline of nature.

The European Parliament plays a key role in calling for this strategy to be implemented quickly and efficiently, in order to bring about the changes necessary to ensure the survival of humanity and the resilience of our planet. In its own own-initiative report on the EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030, Parliament should highlight the following actions as priorities for the Commission:

  1. Management of protected areas primarily for biodiversity
  2. From 2021, ensure a rapid and effective restoration of nature on a large scale
  3. Make the CAP compatible with nature goals and long-term food production
  4. Managing the cumulative effects of human activity on the oceans
  5. Bringing the EU forest strategy into line with the objectives of the EU strategy for the conservation of biodiversity
  6. Make sure that renewable energies are compatible with protecting biodiversity
  7. Enable quick and efficient implementation and enforcement of the strategy
  8. Ensuring sufficient funding to implement this strategy in the long term
  9. Call on the EU to continue its leadership role in biodiversity at global level

Our joint NGO recommendations can be read in full here.

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